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In Remembrance of

King Bhumibol Adulyadej

Let's Get Acquainted with

Our Late Beloved King


By Thawat Wattana
Photos by roya
l courtesy

His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej passed away on 13 October 2016 after a long illness. His Majesty passed away peacefully at Chalermphrakiet Building at Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok. His Majesty was 88 and would have turned 89 on December 5 this year. His reign lasted 70 years, making him the world’s longest-reigning monarch in this century.

Besides, His Majesty was also the acknowledged most hard-working monarch in modern world history. He was beloved and revered by all Thai people, and had earned the sincere respect and admiration of world leaders as shown by the grand celebration in June 2006 of the 60th anniversary of his accession to the throne which was attended by 25 heads of state from all over the world, and the many awards he had been honoured with by international organizations. (Read “List of International Awards Presented to H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej” on page 132) But you may want to know more about this great man. To get acquainted with our late beloved King, please read the following.

  • King Bhumibol Adulyadej, Rama IX, was born on 5 December 1927 at 8.45 a.m. at the Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, when his father Prince Mahidol Adulyadej of Songkhla was a medical student at Harvard University and his mother, Mom Sangwan, was taking courses in nursing and nutrition at nearby Simmons College.

 

  • One corner of Harvard Square is named after Thailand's King Bhumipol – King Bhumibol Adulyadej Square. This square commemorates the birth of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The square was dedicated on April 8, 1990 by Her Royal Highness Princess Chulabhorn, youngest daughter of their Majesties the King and Queen of Thailand.
  • The newborn baby, weighing six pounds, was registered on his birth certificate simply as "Baby Songkhla", as his father was addressed to as "Songkhla" by his classmates. Nine days after his birth, his official name reached Boston. Bestowed by his uncle, King Prajadhipok (Rama VII), it read Bhumibala Adulyadeja, words of Pali origin meaning "Strength of the Land, Incomparable Power". The spelling was later changed to Bhumibol Adulyadej. The King was the second monarch in the world to have been born in the United States, the first being his elder brother Ananda Mahidol, who became King Rama VIII in 1935 but who died prematurely by gunshot in 1946 at the age of 21.
  • At birth the King had the title of Phra Worawongthoe Phra-ong Chao, a prince of the third rank. His nickname as a child was Lek, which means "small" or "minor".
  • The King's full name and title is a very long one, consisting of 7 words and 49 syllables. By the way, the full name of the Thai capital, Bangkok, is an even longer word with 65 syllables.
  • The King was an alumnus of the prestigious Mater Dei School, located near the Ratchaprasong  intersection, Bangkok. He studied there for one year when he was 5, registered as "H.H. Bhumibol Mahidol".

  • As a child, he called the Princess Mother "Mae", like a Thai commoner. He got pocket money from his mother once a week. Even so, he used to be employed to gather vegetables and fruit for sale, and used the money to buy more seeds for planting. He also raised various kinds of animals, such as dogs, rabbits, chickens, grackles, monkeys and sometimes even snakes. Once one of the snakes died, he held a funeral for it. The first dog he kept was a Thai breed. He named it Bobby.


  • The young Prince began to wear eyeglasses before he was 10 years old, because his teacher found that when he took notes from the blackboard, he often had to stand up.
  • The Prince would show a little naughty at times as a boy. When the Princess Mother was going to punish him, she would first ask him the number of strokes he thought he deserved: "How about three?" And he would reply: "Three seems too many. Two would be enough".
  • The royal children were taught the virtue of giving early in their lives. The Princess Mother did so by setting up a piggy bank named the "bank for the poor", and wanting them to put 10 per cent of their earnings from outdoor activities into the bank. At the end of each month, a family meeting would be held to decide how to use the money to benefit the needy.
  • The young Prince got his first camera, a Coronet Midget, with his own savings when he was only 8. He got a radio by joining with his elder brother Prince Mahidol in saving money little by little, buying the parts one by one, assembling them together, and then sharing the use of the set. When he wanted to buy a bicycle and asked his mother for help, he was told to wait until his savings became more substantial.
  • The Princess Mother once asked the School of Arts and Crafts in Bangkok to make a map of Thailand in the pattern of a jigsaw for the young Prince, in order to make him acquainted with the physical features, political divisions and other data of the country by playing the  jigsaw repeatedly.
  • The King played several musical instruments, including the piano, guitar and saxophone. But the first instrument he learned to play was the accordion.  He became keenly interested in music when he was about 14 or 15. He bought a second-hand saxophone for 300 francs in order to learn to play it, with half of the money from his own savings and the other half from the  Princess Mother. His music teacher was an Alsatian.  An American newspaper once reported that the saxophone of the King was made of gold. When asked about this, the King dismissed the story, saying, it would just be too heavy to carry.

  • The King was not only a musician, but also a composer. He wrote his first song titled "The Candlelight Blue" when he was 18. He had written a total of 48 songs. The last, A Menu of Eggs, was composed in 1995 when he was 68. The lyrics to the song was written by his second daughter Princess Sirindhorn.
  • Another hobby of the King was photography. As was shown in many photos of his rural visits, he always carried a camera with him. But it was not so widely known that the King was also interested in cinematography. Some films made by the King were shown to the public with the proceeds going to the construction of the Red Cross Society office and Bhumibol Hospital, and to the projects for the treatment of polio and leprosy.
  • When he was young, the King was an athlete, especially keen on badminton, skiing and sailing.  In 1967, he participated in the 4th South East Asian Peninsula Games (now SEA Games) and won the gold medal in the OK dinghy class in the sailing competition.         
  • The King first met his future queen, Mom Rajawongse Sirikit, in Paris, where her father was serving as ambassador. She was 15 years old and training to be a concert pianist. According to an interview given by the Queen, the appointed time was 4 p.m. but the King did not appear until 7 p.m. Later it was revealed that the King’s car broke down.  The betrothal ceremony took place on 19 July 1949 and the Royal Wedding was held at Sa Pathum Palace in Bangkok on 28 April 1950. The couple made their marriage registration in exactly the same way as the commoners, with the affixing of a 10 satang revenue stamp to the certificate and the payment of a registration fee of 10 baht. After the wedding ceremony, the Royal couple went to Hua Hin for a honeymoon.

  • The King was ordained as a Buddhist monk in accordance with the Thai tradition at the Temple of the Emerald Buddha in the compound of the Grand Palace on 22 October 1956 and then went to Bowon Niwet Temple for a stay of 15 days under the guardianship of the Venerable Yansangwon, the late Supreme Patriarch.
  • Articles for the King's daily use were not necessarily expensive or with a brand name. Thus, things to be presented to the King need not be high-priced. Anything offered with affection would be acceptable. The King never wore ornaments such as rings, necklaces, and other valuables. He only wore a watch.
  • The King normally drew 12 pencils from the stationery office in a year, averaging one in a month. He used every one until it was too short to be held.
  • The King always used his toothpaste until the tube was completely flat like a piece of paper. This was a habit formed in his childhood.
  • The King always carried three things with him every time he made an inspection tour of a rural area: a map (that was cut and pasted by himself), a camera and a pencil with a rubber end.
  • Going out each time, the King required his entourage to share their cars instead of using a car each, so that the motorcade would not be too long, worsening the traffic jam.

  • The King once made a tour of a water project at Huai Sat Yai. Just as the royal helicopter was touching down, it began to rain heavily. The King, seeing that the local officials and villagers who had lined up to  welcome him, were all drenched with rain, ordered his guard to fold up the umbrella and walked to meet the welcoming group without cover.
  • The numerous royal development projects of Chitralada Villa started with a privy purse fund of 32,866.73 baht coming from the sales of music books by Phra Chenduriyang and milk produced by the royally operated farms.

  • The late M.R. Kukrit Pramoj once asked the King whether he had ever felt tired and discouraged. The King replied that to tell the truth, it's indeed discouraging sometimes. Some happenings did make one disheartened. But one just could not afford to feel frustrated, since the stake was so very high. It was tantamount to the whole state, the happiness of the people of the whole country.
  • The King cared for the welfare of his people at all times. Even only five hours before he was scheduled to undergo surgery on his vertebra (on 20 July 2006), he instructed an attendant to start up the computer so that in case the oncoming tropical storm should hit Thailand and cause flooding, he could monitor and try to help.
  • The King had a liking for most kinds of vegetables, except coriander, onion and preserved cabbage. His staple was brown rice. His favourite drink was Ovaltine. He refrained from eating Tilapia nilotica, because the fish was introduced to Thailand through him. The first batch of 50 tilapia was shipped to Bangkok from Japan on March 25, 1965, as a birthday present to the King from Emperor Akihito. They were bred at Chitralada Villa and then  distributed to the whole country.

  • The King kept abreast of the latest developments in the country and the world by reading local newspapers in Thai and English in the morning and news magazines such as Time, Newsweek and Asiaweek in the evening. He also listened to the French news broadcast from UBC regularly.
  • The King's study was on the 8th floor of Chitralada Villa near his bedroom. It was a small room 3 x 4 metres in size, filled with a radio, telephone, television, fax, computer, sound equipment, meteorograph and maps.
  • The King was acquainted with six languages: Thai, Latin, French, English, German and Spanish.
  • When filling out an important document for the King, the official in charge always wrote in the column of "occupation", "ทำราชการ", which means "working in the government service".
  • The King's right eye was damaged in a car accident in Lausanne, Switzerland when he was 20 years old. His car crashed with a truck. As a result, his right eye was pierced by bits of broken glass, and had to be replaced with an artificial one.
  • The King awarded diplomas to Thai university graduates for the first time in 1950. According to unofficial statistics, the King had presided over 490 such ceremonies in 29 years continuously, during which he had handed out a total of 470,000 diplomas, weighing, at 3 grams each, a total of 141 tonnes.
  • The saddest day for the King was the day when the Princess Mother passed away (on 18 July 1995). The night before the King waited at the bedside until 4 or 5 a.m. Seeing that Mother had gone asleep, the King went back to the Royal Residence Villa. But no sooner had he arrived there than a telephone call came from the hospital to report that the Princess Mother had passed away. The King hurried back to the hospital and found that Mother was lying peacefully in the bed. He stepped forward, kneeled down, buried his head in her chest for a long while, and then raised his face which was wet with tears.

  • This article cannot be ended without mentioning the King's favourite dog which he named Khun Thongdaeng Suwannachat. Both the former, a Thai word, and the latter, a Pali word, mean literally "red gold", but the actual meaning of Thongdaeng is "copper". The dog was a female of a Thai strain, brown in colour with white legs. She was very well disciplined, intelligent and respectful. Her special status had not made her haughty. She had often appeared with the King on television. Wearing a white coat, she always sat at the feet of the King, alert and quiet. She died on 26 December 2015, at the age of 17. In addition to this Canine of the Reign, the King also kept 33 other dogs.

_____________________________________________________________________________________
Sources of Material:

Our Beloved King --- A Great Agronomist and a Modal  Filial Son, by Col. Thongkhan Siyothin
King Bhumibol Adulyadej --- A Life's Work. Published in 2011 by Editions Didier Mille
_____________________________________________________________________________________

In Remembrance of

King Bhumibol Adulyadej

The Role of Our Late Beloved King

An Interview with Former
Prime Minister Anand Panyarachun


Photos by royal courtesy

The following is an interview given by former Thai prime minister Anand Panyarachun to Ms. Rozi Ali of the New Straits Times and Malaysian Business, on the role of the late His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej. It was printed in the 12 March 1995 issue of the Bangkok Post. A reprint of the article here is considered most appropriate when Thailand is now in a one-year official mourning period after the passing away  of our beloved king, on 13 October 2016. 

The interview is particularly valuable because it was given by none other than the most knowledgeable person who served twice as prime minister in the critical juncture in Thai politics in the early ’90s. The reader will learn from the article how the late His Majesty had contributed to the welfare of the nation and especially how he had prudently played his role as a constitutional monarch to guide the national political development to the best benefit of his country and people. – Ed.

Please comment on the role of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej.
Thailand has been a kingdom ever since a state was founded nearly 800 years ago. It is only in the last 60 years or so that the King as Chief of State became what is now known as constitutional ruler, that is to say he is not above the law.

As a constitutional King, he has as much power and responsibility as, for example, the Queen of England, or the King of Sweden. So, that was the transition from the absolute monarch to the constitutional monarch.

It so happens that the present King is the longest-reigning monarch in the world. In a year and a half, he will have completed the 50th year of his reign. So, if you view it as his life or his career, our King has been a practicing constitutional monarch for 48-49 years. That is an achievement in itself.

In Thailand in general, the institution of monarchy and the monarch or the King are consistently held in respect. But of course, throughout our history, whoever the King was and is, he has to earn the respect, has to earn the admiration and has to earn the recognition.

By birthright, of course, people are prepared to defer to him or her as our King, as our queen or as our monarch. But in modern times, the people look to his achievement,  look to his behavior, and look to his personality.

Our present King is very much loved, genuinely loved and genuinely admired and respected by the people.
           
What are the grounds that actually make the people generally love him and admire him?
He is the most-travelled King in Thailand. He knows every remote part of the country. In his younger days, he used to trek, he used to walk up the mountains, he used to walk through forests because he has always been interested in the agricultural sector in Thailand, knowing full well of course that ours is an agricultural society. So, in his younger days and even up till now he spends a lot of time in the remote provinces.



He would know every river, every stream, every creek, every mountain and every pass. He is a good map reader. He has well over 1,600* of what we call royally-sponsored projects, many of which are pilot projects, pioneer projects, dealing with irrigation, dealing with reafforestation, dealing with soil erosion, dealing with education, dealing with many aspects of life of poverty-stricken people.

So these were his daily doings and even without publicity, people would know that here we have a King, we have a monarch who just does not sit on the throne and idle his time away. Here is a hard-working monarch who looks into the interests, the well-being of his people and who wants to share his experience and his wealth as well as his time with the common people.
           
I think these are his personal characteristics that have endeared him to the nation. And, of course, in our political history in which we saw many upheavals, many bizarre sorts of episode, he had lent his aura, personality and status to smooth out the upheavals and overcome some of the national crises that came about.


           
What sort of intervention did he give during these crises? Was it direct or…
No, I think he did it in a Thai way. You see our King is a constitutional monarch and he is very careful that he does not go beyond his constitutional role. He knows that as a constitutional monarch, he only has three duties.
           
The first one, he has the right to be consulted, so he has the right to be consulted by the prime minister or by the government. Second right, he has the right to warn and then he has the right to encourage. He keeps strictly to the three rights that he has.
           
But of course, in the Asian sort of tradition or in the Thai historical perspective, there are certain rights bestowed upon the King, not by the legal system but by the popular will of the people.
           
So I think in the Thai scene, the Thai people, as compared to the English or to the Swedish, are prepared to confer on our King more rights and more duties than the Swedish or the English people are prepared to give their king and queen. But these are not rights conferred upon them by law, but because of our respect, because of our admiration and because of our love and reverence.
           
So, in a way, our King does wield certain indirect influence over the working of the government but he has always done it very discreetly. He has always done it in a way which does not benefit him directly or indirectly. He does not do it for his own good; he does it for the good of the nation. I think that the Thai people are well aware of that.
           
So when you talk about his intervention, it is not an intervention in the normal sense of the word. That it is an intervention at a very last minute – in a way at the behest of his own people. People were waiting for him to intervene. If you read the events of those days correctly, you would appreciate the timing of his intervention.



So he does not intervene just for the sheer exercise of intervention but he knows the time is right and the nation cannot tolerate such a situation any longer. Then he would “come down” in a Thai sense of the word and do something about it. And that automatically within a second, the whole crisis would disappear. And all these interventions were made strictly for the benefit of the people, the well-being of the people and for the good of the nation.

One thing I find so remarkable about the Thai King is that when he intervened during these crises, within seconds, normalcy is restored to the country, the military just obeyed whatever he advised them…

Yes, in a way, he acted just like the headmaster, telling off his students …come on… stop being naughty. But he has earned that right. It is not a divine right, not that every king can do it. I mean after all, you have to run the risk of trying to be a headmaster and telling off the students and the students would rebel further. There is always that element of risk.

In your view, why is it that the military respect the King so much?
Well, our military, whatever their short-comings, whatever their weaknesses, they basically are loyal to the monarchy, to the King. Their loyalty to the institution and to our present King are absolute. So I think this is something which is unique.

What do you think is the most significant contribution of the present King to the country’s development?

Well, his utterances and his statements, you know, in whatever context at whatever time, are very often heeded to and are very often followed. He acts as a kind of guiding light, for people who occasionally have to grope about in darkness or in a mystical condition, the kind of father figure.

And of course he has to follow certain ways, his royal rituals; and yet he is man with his feet firmly on the ground and he can talk to common people just like another fellow Thai citizen, no protocol – nothing in between him and the people in Thailand.

Do you find that he follows the country’s development very keenly?

Very keenly, particularly in the agricultural sector. I mentioned over 1,600* royal projects he initiated and he even initiated some royal projects in Laos at the request of the former Head of State of Laos, Mr Kraisorn.

Why is there particular emphasis on agriculture?

Well, the livelihood of 60-70 percent of our workforce is still dependent on agriculture and in a population of 59 million people, you have to count about nearly 30 million people in that sector and that is where the poverty lies.

The rising middle class only pertains to the urban people and the people in the commercial or industrial sector. The agricultural labour force does not move up the ladder, they remain relatively poor. That is why it is always His Majesty the King’s consideration in alleviating the plight of the farmers, helping the farmers, being in closest touch with the farmers.

In terms of economic policy-making, is the King actually advocating any kind of advice?

No. As a constitutional monarch, he has the right to be consulted, so the prime minister of Thailand would have the privilege of being received in audience by the King once a week or once every two weeks.

As a prime minister, you have the duty to report certain policy, certain major developments to him. The frequency of the audience depends on many factors, but once you made the report you clarified the situation to His Majesty, then His Majesty would feel it is in his constitutional right to respond or to express opinion.

During your experience as a premier of Thailand, and during your visit to the King, what sort of…

Well, the conversations between a prime minister and the King are, at least in my own case, all confidential. They are private nature. But of course, there are certain matters that I can reveal whenever I want to embark on a major policy or major policy change.

I would report to him particularly on matters which need legislative action because all the bills that are passed by the Parliament would have his signature. So it is your duty to report on all matters which go into Parliament which would need enactment and would eventually need royal signature. So that is one area of reporting.

Another area of reporting is that you know what his interests are, so be it the construction of a dam, be it the construction of irrigation canals or planning this or that, you talk to him. It is not by was of reporting, it is by way of keeping him fully informed of what your government is doing or what it is aiming to do and keeping him abreast of the events that he should not be caught off guard or by surprise.

So, that is his right to be consulted and he has maintained that right very strictly and of course he has two other rights, right to encourage and right to warn.

I suppose, whenever he feels the government is moving in the right direction, he would encourage them, and if he feels that we are sort of veering off the main path, he would warn us. But those are limited rights on their own, imposed by law. But his personal influence, his personal thinking into the work of government would vary from one king to another.

It so happens that this King is a very experienced King and still a practicing King, who has devoted his entire life to the public good. He is in fact our public servant number one in Thailand. And mind you, he is also accountable.

In what sense?

Well, what he does is seen by the public. Not accountable in the legal sense of the word, but … there is transparency in what he does or what he is doing.

That is unique.

I would say he is unique. He cannot be compared to any other kings around the world. But as I said, you know, what he is today is not what he was when he ascended to the throne 48 years ago. So there are certain features of his kingship that have accumulated by years of experience. People have trust in him.

When you were Premier, what sort of role did the King play?

Our King has the way of sending signals to people. You have to make sure that you understand his signal because in his position, he cannot say “yes” or “no” or “yes, I like that”, “no, I do not like that”, because he is constantly aware of his constitutional limitation. So you really have to be able to read his signal because sometimes his signals are not loud and clear.

His Majesty the King is a man of tremendous self-discipline. When he went into the monkhood, he studied religion very religiously, and now he is the man of self-discipline. He understands reality of life.

He knows that certain things cannot be changed. And he has, in the Thai language, we say he has no “atta”, he has no “ego”. He has no sense of self-importance. The world “atta” cannot really be translated into English. It is a word in the Buddhist teaching but it is similar to “ego”.



He is completely detached. When you say people have attachment to persons, or to an object, attachment to love, attachment to jealousy, attachment to individual, attachment to respect, attachment to power, attachment to position, attachment to wealth; to be a really good Buddhist, you must dispossess yourself of all these attachments.

So, you sort of dispossess yourself of your own ego. You only do it for the good of the community, for the public good, that is how he conducts his daily life. This is my own interpretation.

It would be unfair to make a comparison between the Thai King and other monarchs because after all, I have never lived under other monarchs and the fact that I was prime minister twice has given me the opportunity to see him at close range and to observe his conduct of affairs.

As an observer of the monarchical scene, definitely, the institution and the King himself are held in a much higher degree of respect and admiration than in most other countries, perhaps with an exception of the Japanese Imperial Family, the Emperor of Japan. But there again, because of the constitutional constraint and tradition, the Emperor of Japan has not been able to get close to the common people.

You know there is a dictum that the King can do no wrong. In our case, the King really can do no wrong.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Remarks:
Throughout his 70 years on the throne, the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej initiated more than 4,000 royal development projects, all of which are aimed at improving the living conditions of his people, particularly those in the remote rural areas.
______________________________________________________________________________________

In Remembrance of

King Bhumibol Adulyadej

List of International Awards

Presented to H.M. King Bhumibol Adulyadej


Photos by royal courtesy

His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej’s many outstanding talents and meritorious deeds have been recognized worldwide. It appears that the King was the only monarch inventing several inventions such as the Chai Pattana Aerator and the King’s own methods of artificial rainmaking for the wellbeing of his subjects.

H.M. King Bhumibol is also admired internationally for his efforts throughout his reign. His Majesty has received many awards and other forms of recognition from different organizations and agencies under the UN, namely for his contributions to the improvement of the environment and nature conservation. Listed below are the awards that the King received. 
 
1975   Special Medal of the European Parliament presented by the European Parliament on 19 July 1975.

1986   IAUP Peace Award, in recognition of His Majesty’s dedication to higher education and promotion of peace in Southeast Asia presented by the International Association of University Presidents, Seoul, Korea, on 8 September 1986.



1987    - Gold Medal award for His Majesty’s outstanding leadership in rural development presented by the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) on 21 July 1987.
            - William J. Donovan Medal, Award of Friendship OSS, New York, U.S.A. presented by the Office of Strategic Services on 29 October 1987.

1989    Gold Medal to commemorate the occasion of the Joint Academic Meeting between the Royal College of Surgeons of Thailand and Royal College of Surgeons of England, presented by the Royal College of Surgeons of England on 3 October 1989.

1991    - Rotary International Award of Honour presented by Rotary International, Illinois, U.S.A. on 17 August 1991.
            - Philae Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s devotion to rural development and people’s wellbeing, presented by UNESCO, Paris on 2 December 1991.



1992    - UNEP Gold Medal of Distinction, in recognition of long, dedicated, exemplary and eminent contributions to the improvement of the environment and nature conservation, presented by UNEP, Nairobi, Kenya on 4 November 1992.
             - Healty-for-All Gold Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s outstanding contributions to achievement of the social goal of health for all by the year 2000, presented by WHO, Geneva on 24 November 1992.

1993    - Natura Pro Futura Medal for the conservation of biodiversity, presented by the International Society of Chemical Ecology (ISCE) on 26 January 1993.
             - International Merit Award, in recognition of His Majesty’s contribution to the use of vetiver for soil conservation and environmental improvement, presented by the International Erosion Control Association on 25 February 1993.
            - Award of Recognition of technical and development accomplishment in the promotion of the vetiver technology international, presented by World Bank on 30 October 1993.



1994    Award of appreciation, in recognition of His Majesty’s outstanding contributions to drug control efforts in Thailand, presented by United Nations International Drug Control Programme (USDCP) on 12 December 1994.


1995    Agricola Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s devotion to the well-being and happiness of all people in Thailand, particularly those who till the soil, tend the waters and nurture the forests, presented by FAO on 6 December 1995.

1996   - International Rice Award Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s passionate and personal interest in and devotion to the well-being of rice farmers and consumers, presented by International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) on 5 June 1996.
          - Presidential Citation for Humanitarian Service presented by Rotary International on 24 October 1996.
          - Partnering for World Health Award, in recognition of His Majesty’s efforts to promote the prevention and cure of chest diseases in Thailand, presented by American College of Chest Physicians, on 13 November 1996.

1997  - Award of recognition of His Majesty’s strong support for meteorology and operational hydrology, presented by World Meteorological Organization on 18 February 1997.
          - ICCIDD Gold Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s leadership, guidance and direction to the National IDD Control Project, presented by International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD) on 25 June 1997.
          - Plaque of Honour, in recognition of His Majesty’s literary works, presented by the Organizing Committee of S.E.A. Write Awards on 8 July 1997.



1998    Gold Medal Award, in recognition of His Majesty’s long, invaluable contributions to global lung health, presented by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) on 24 November 1998.

1999    - Lions Humanitarian Award, in recognition of His Majesty’s passionate and personal interest in, and devotion to, improving the quality of life and well-being of the Thai people, especially in the areas of health and education, presented by the International Association of Lions Clubs on 3 March 1999.
            - Telefood Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s dedication to Thailand’s agricultural development with the aim of raising the farmers’ standard of living and establishing food security, presented by FAQ on 8 December 1999.

2000   - Sanford Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s preserving of the musical culture of Thailand through education and performance, presented by Yale University School of Music on 18 January 2000.



           - Lalaounis Cup, in recognition of His Majesty’s outstanding merit in the course of athleticism and His Majesty’s faithfulness to the Olympic Ideal, presented by the IOC on 19 February 2000.
           - WHO Plaque, in recognition of His Majesty’s unstinting and powerful moral leadership and example in public health, presented by WHO on 31 May 2000.
          - Merie de I’Invention, in recognition of His Majesty’s outstanding services to the course of progress and His Majesty’s assistance to the inventions, presented by the Belgian Chamber of Inventors on 5 June 2000.
          - The Berkeley Medal, in recognition of His Majesty’s remarkable devotion to the people of Thailand and for the great contributions toward the political stability and economic vitality of the country, presented by the University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A. on 2 November 2000.

2001   - 49th World Exhibition of Innovation, Research and New Technology presented by Organizing Committee of Brussels Eureka 2000, on 16 February 2001.
           - Golden Shining Symbol of World Leadership in recognition of His Majesty’s outstanding support for Thai boxing and all sports in Thailand, presented by World Boxing Council on 26 November 2001.

2004   UN-Habitat Scroll of Honour Award (special citation) in recognition of His Majesty’s outstanding contribution to sustaining habitats and improving the quality of the Thai people’s lives, presented by United Nations Human Settlements Programme on 25 February 2004.



2005    Golden Ear of Paddy, commemorating the outstanding leadership in Rural Development of His Majesty the King, presented by Asia-Pacific Rural and Agricultural, Credit Association Bangkok on 23 May 2005.

2006    UNDP Human Development Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of the global relevance of his call for a sufficiency approach to development, presented by United Nations Development Programme on 26 May 2006.


2007    First Dr. Narman E. Borlaug Medallion for the King’s outstanding humanitarian service in alleviating starvation and poverty through thousands of his royal projects, presented by Hon, Robert D.Ray, the former Governor of Iowa, on 23 July 2007.


2009  Global Leaders Award on Intellectual Property, presented by WIPO on 14 January 2009. His Majesty is the first recipient of this Award as WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) acknowledges His Majesty’s outstanding contribution to the cause of intellectual property to promote development both domestically and internationally.


2012   Humanitarian Soil Scientist Award, presented by the International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS) on 16 April 2012.  His Majesty the King was honoured as the first recipient of the Humanitarian Soil Scientist award for his dedication to soil resource management.


 

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